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20121228
20121228
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"newsline". experts with japan's nuclear regulation authority are getting closer to determining whether the only operating nuclear plant in the country can keep generating power. they carried out a second inspection at the ohi plant to figure out if an active fault runs beneath the facility. the five member team returned to ohi to inspect a trench the nra had ordered plant operator kansai electric to double the length of the trench after the first onsite inspection in november. crews dug it to 100 meters. representatives of the nuclear watchdog say they will ask kansai electric to shut down the plant if inspectors conclude an active fault runs underneath it. kansai electric executives insist land slips and not a fault caused the fissures below ohi. >> translator: we'll carefully analyze what we saw today. it won't be an easy task determining what it is. >> the team of experts will be back at the plant on saturday. then they will meet early next year to produce an assessment based on the results of their inspection. >>> nra experts are checking the ground beneath a number of powe
>>> welcome to nhk world "newsline". experts with japan's nuclear regulation authority are getting closer to determining whether the only operating nuclear plant in the country can keep generating power. they carried out a second inspection at the ohi plant to figure out if an active fault runs beneath the facility. the five member team returned to ohi to inspect a trench the nra had ordered plant operator kansai electric to double the length of the trench after the first onsite inspection in november. crews dug it to 100 meters. representatives of the nuclear watchdog say they will ask kansai electric to shut down the plant if inspectors conclude an active fault runs underneath it. government guidelines ban the construction of key nuclear facilities on active faults. kansai electric executives insist land slips and not a fault caused the fissures below ohi. after friday's inspection, the shik zach shimazaki said they will look for answers. >> translator: we'll carefully analyze what we saw today. it won't be an easy task determining what it is. >> the team of experts will be back
was under military rule for almost 25 years. the nation has been strengthening ties with japan and western nations since its transition to civilian rule in march of last year. but the country's leaders have also been trying to maintain close ties with china. japan's new government has promised to repair frayed ties with south dakota. he spoke with south korea's kim a day after taking office, saying south korea is japan's most important neighbor and they share fundamental values and interests. he alluded to a dispute over the senkaku islands in the sea of japan. kim said it's important to maintain close communications. they agreed to work closely on issues relating to north korea. >>> japanese government officials may be looking forward to the new year, but they have to sort through a slew of economic data first. so what can you tell us? >> you're right, they can't kick up their heels just yet, because they have a handful of economic indicators to sort through for japan for november. the jobless rate improved to 4.1%. officials at the internal affairs ministry say the figure is out 0.1 prog
general of japan with us and i want to bring them on so they can do the official thing that they have done for several years and exchange oragami decorations and kind of a symbolic friendship act here in city hall and don't forget that san francisco is where the united nations is was founded. one more thing that was very interesting to me this year the council general's wife coordinated the gathering of wishes for the tree of hope for 40 other consulates around the globe. >> thank you for doing that. the mayor of san francisco, the council general of japan and his name is... wait a minute, i have it. his name is heroshi, imamata. >> happy holidays everyone, welcome to the great city of san francisco, that dress, donna will make santa claus stay up all night. any way, i want to welcome everybody again to city hall, and to view our wonderful, wonderful tree of hope. it is something that i enjoy every year that it has been here and i tell you when it was announced that this was the tallest, largest tree of hope in the united states, if not in the world, i also wanted to say my very first thou
. >>> and japan's finance minister is saying other companies have no right to lecture japan on its currency policy instead calling for the u.s. to seek a strong dollar. >>> okay. welcome back to "worldwide exchange" this morning. let's take a quick check on trade as we close out the last full trading week of the year. not even a full week, but just one of the last trading weeks of the year. >> monday seems so far away. >> it's just kind of sticking out there, the 24th and 31st. european markets were closed for boxing day week. got back into trade yesterday. sort of a mixed bag across the board. u.s. markets were weaker and this morning europe is following the u.s. down that path. the ftse just a little bit lower. the xetra dax down by .1%. the cac 40 which was one of the strong performers yesterday giving up some of its gains. the ibex 35 underperforming. >> the penny stock not worth a whole lot so you have to take that into consideration. but yeah, drifting lower on the bond markets. today we have this italian debt auction which would be interesting. we've got rome offering somewhere in 2 to 3 bi
people telling stories about san francisco's japan town, i began to come across this whole theme of during the internment camps japanese americans were interned. in this vacuum in japan town, there was the fillmore district with african americans and a variety of other people and they moved into the community. and then japanese americans get out of camp and they come back to their neighborhood that has been populated and made into a different life and different world and what happens when those two communities overlap and intersect? whose place is it, whose home is it? who is an american? how do we sort of coexist in this post war period where the people from that community are by and large marginalized, yet you have this whole kind of other thing happening where it's -- the war has been won, this is like new things, television is happening, advertising, this whole advertising thing is happening. so you have these marginalized peoples and what happens, is it possible to develop a kind of at that moment a cross-cultural community? is it possible to have kind of a multi cultural co
, including japan. >> yes. >> rose: and how influential was that? >> it was life changing. life changing. >> rose: life changing. >> yeah. i had a small stint teaching english in japan and i promised myself i'd go back to japan to do it right and to absorb the food culture and to stay there almost a year. it changed the way i viewed food. food didn't have to be good just for the fine dining level and that was one of the misconceptions that i had about food that you could only eat well in fine dining restaurants in new york, for instance. and in japan from cheap restaurants to very fancy chai secchi restaurants everything was cooked with so much passion, a very ingredient driven and it was good. everyone cared about food. it was a cherished thing. >> rose: they love food in japan and they practice the art of cooking to a high level. >> rose: it's amazing. people that travel japan need to stay there longer than a week. they need go there for at least three weeks and soak up tokyo and other cities, osaka and tokyo. there's a lot to learn, particularly about food. >> rose: one of the things
out in areas just as the tsunami in south east asia and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded world and we found that providing a little bit of humanitarian aid and a lot of courage and hope it is amazing that people in desperate circumstances can do to improve theirs life. so seven years ago we really have a feeling that in the united states, we really need to increase our hope also. and we decided to do that by creating a global art project, the world, tree of hope. and what you see behind you is a live, 23-foot christmas tree and it is covered with 10,
of a book it's a huge book, set in japan and covers the earth from 1939 and 1966 about 2 brothers and the title is a street of a thousand blossoms. if you haven't noticed we are talking about themes that run through my book. one of the things i like a lot is exploring subcultures. the lepercy. the silk working women. i like to write about groups of people who persevere and make a life on their own aside from what the general culture is doing. i find that i don't consciously sit down and do that but it happens. in this particular book something that has fascinated me is sumo and sumo wrestlers and how they get so big and what it's like in their culture. one of the brothers becomes an sumo and that's why it's a big book! [laughter]. >> do you think that -- being a woman who is in women have been oppressed -- i don't know if they are now or not, dou think that has stimulated you in your writing coming out of that? you specifically and in general, do you feel like a lot of women have been stimulated by being part of an oppressed class? >> good question. >> very much so. i will try
were involved in relief operations in areas around the plant. japan piece in the government says it whalers are heading out to the sea but only carrying out research. the main group departed on the annual hunt in the southern ocean surrounding antarctica. japan introduced scientific whaling to avoid a commercial willing than under a 1986 moratorium. a man and australia survived being mauled by a shark. he was serving in new south wales. he lost a finger and chunk of his five. putting on a brave face for the cameras but shark attacks are unusual this time of year. >> the dolphins swimming all around him and all of the sudden the sharp just comes up and took for the chunks out of him and then he'd actually put the nose of the board into the bull shark's head. >> did a marvelous job. >> the chinese government has approved a law forcing internet users to use their real names. china says the new rules will help prevent rumors from spreading and clamp down on corruption. but on-line freedom advocates say the policy is intended to stifle dissent. robert bride is in hong kong and send th
theaters reaching extraordinarily diverse audiences. from here to japan, his acclaimed sisters, maximoto premiered in 2005. in the last couple years he worked with camposanto on a fist of roses on male violence and an orchestral composition. many of his plays are collected in month more cherry blossoms published by washington press. among his awards are the civil liberties public education fund and lila wallace reader's digest award. phillip is also a respected independent film maker whose film recently premiered at sundance, but we're here to talk about his upcoming production, after the war. a jazz-infused drama set in post-war san francisco japan town in 1948 which chronicles the return of japanese americans into the internment -- from the internment camp. sharing this evening is chloe veltman. chloe was born in london and received a master's degree with distinction in conjunction with harvard university and the moscow art theater school. she has worked as a staff reporter for the daily telegraph and is a freelance writer, her articles appearing on both sides of the atlantic. she is t
's happening in japan. you guys may recall yesterday it was up .9%. this market has been on a tear this year. it's up more than 20 one of the best asset classes. the yen continues to weaken. there's two reasons why we're focusing here. we got weak economic data out of japan. industrial production decline. we saw core consumer prices decline. we can show you, though, what's happening with the yen. we're seeing the new finance minister coming out and saying to other countries, you know, look, we're not trying to materially weaken our yen and you have no place to accuse us of doing so. he says a strong dollar policy would benefit the u.s. very much so. and, again, might benefit japan, too, because that will make it a lot easier to get that yen lower. today, the dollar/yen is up .2% because it's important at this junction now that we've seen the new government come in, now that we've seen the new cabinet ministers, people who were expecting a lot of fiscal and monetary magic from to look at the data overnight and be reminded that it's no guarantee japan will magically be able to rejiger its econ
from the political grapevine. how does a country unapologize? japan may look to find out. "new york times" report the new government may revise 20-year-old apology to women forced to sexual slavery. the chief cabinet secretary declineed to uphold the apoll saying it would be desirable for experts and historians to study the 1993 statement. japan will hold up a larger apology. they will call on japan not to forget the militaristic past. >> go visit your parents. in china that is an order. they require adult children to visit the aging parents often. it does not specify how often. the parents feel they are neglected and sue them. it comes with reports of parents abandoned or ignored by the children. >>> as we talk about, there is a clear tuition over the fiscal cliff. they are working on the legislation, they will watch another battle on sunday. >> we are going to vote sunday night. probably watch the skins-cowboys game. >> washington and dallas play sunday night with the nfc east title on the line. the father played for the redskins in the 1930s. they were in boston at the time. >> m
fire. check out these monkeys hovering around a fire in a zoo in japan. the zoo keepers take sweet potatoes in the fire and the monkeys scramble to get their hands on them. >> now, you're weather forecast. -- your whether forecast, -- weather forecast. >> still a little breezy this evening. not too bad. winds will be nearly calm. when you put that together with the sky clearing, temperatures will drop off quickly. it is down to 28. still 37 at the airport. when you wake up tomorrow morning, most spots will be in the 20's. but without the wind. our next storm, you can tell this will not be a blockbuster storm by taking a look at the advisories issued ahead of the storms. hardly anything out here. the storm is in two pieces right now. it will come together and zip over towards us by saturday. let's talk about it. how we will have the time frame at 7:32 morning. nothing going on. early saturday morning, the storm will approach from the west and southwest. you can see snow developing in western maryland by 7:30 in the morning saturday. the peak of the storm will be during the midday ho
's bring in the director of japan studies at the american enterprise institute. thank you for joining us and i thank you for having me. hello, heather. heather: you have this article that you wrote for the national review online. the very first line of your article says this. save yourself a few precious minutes and ignoring everything that the u.s. government says about north korea. so what is going on? >> welcome the truth is we don't know what is going on. we are pretty clueless about north korea. all we know is that when it's time fore holidays and for us to relax, north korea will do something crazy like launching rockets on july 4 or maybe setting up another nuclear test around new year's. you know, we go through these cycles. we assume that one day we are going to get them back to the negotiating table, we try to do that, and then they turn around and they break their promise. we are right back where we started from. my point is that i think we should really stop thinking about what we can do to handle this situation. rather, we should accept that the north koreans control the tab
and protest the fact they wanted to have a nuclear power plant sitting next to an earthquake fault. in japan i think the conversation around nuclear power is shifting again and there are challenges to it and this is not new. this conversation has been around forever and that is pg&e and nuclear power and all of that and here we are in 2012 still having the conversation, so i mean i wouldn't under estimate again the type of opposition, however subtle or not, that this program is going to have to conwith. that's why it's critical how we accurately inform people in the city around the value of this program. >> thank you commissioner olague. president carter also wore a button down sweater when he made that statement. >> did he? >> it's important to note that ronald regan removed those solar panels from the white house. i am unclear on the agenda and on ours it doesn't mention any possible action item, but on the document for the public utilities commission it does and i think we want to make sure we're either today or the next puc meeting but i hope that's the plan, the framework of the pla
been arrested for trespassing charges in japan. this is happening on the island of okinawa, where the u.s. navy and marine corps is based. they say the 27-year-old corporal was assigned to a camp -- he entered the veranda of an apartment in the city. as we know back in october a u.s. service member was charged for raping a japanese woman in that same area, so since that time there has been a curfew for all u.s. service members in okinawa. clearly if this is true this u.s. marine has broken those stipulations. we will follow this story as well. any new details, we will pass them along. >> thank you. coming up, we are hearing from the victim of a carjacking in >> two man accused of brutally beating a man in southeast d.c. are to be arraigned. the grand judy -- grand jury at arraign them -- they are charged with attacking tc maslin august who now faces severe brain injuries. loudoun county police are investigating a deadly shooting in sterling. a man was found dead at 7:00 thursday night. the victim has not been identified. it appears the shooting was not a random act. if you have any info
. look at this the movingies at a zoo in central japan love gathering around a warm fire and roasting smores. zoo keepers say the campfire every day they keep it going during the winter for their monkies they have 160 and they satan malls love sitting by the flames and warming their backs. zoo keepers used the fire to bake potatoe. they say the treats are always a big hit or at least that's what the zoo keepers say. >> you thought they liked bananas. >> this is bella a record breaking great dane according to guinness book of world records she is the world's tallest living female dog. bella is in arizona weighing 170 pounds and she eats four cups of food every day. wow. she is standing on all fours she is over 4 feet tall and her owners say they were inspired to put her in the running for the title after -- matching shirts there you go. he was the former record holder for the tallest dog ever four cups of food and bella is a big one. >> we have dogs and i he don't think that our -- and don't think our dog's weight combined with come close to bella. >> i have a beagel this big. the paws
video tutorial to help you solve some common problems. this one we think is coming to us from japan. what problem do we need to solve? [ baby crying ] >> the crying baby. >> they need to put this on a plane. >> this is like the crying baby tutorial kind of infomercial, but they're not really selling you anything, they're teaching you how to make your baby stop crying in three seconds. first, you drink a glass of water. you slurp it. two steps, drink water, slurp it. yeah, that's it. blow some of it out of your mouth. >> we're in -- i don't think you can blow it out. >> let me try this. >> blow it out? what are you doing, a spit take in the baby's face? >> yeah, you can't. doesn't work. >> i am highly impressed right now. i want to see it work. >> does that mimic the sounds inside the womb? >> possibly. >> is that what's happening here? it sounds like home? >> that's what i'm guessing. >> that baby looked really a peace afterwards there. it really looked calm. >> we want to know if this works for you. try this out, video it and upload those videos. >>> it's the end of a great year in
is in recession, japan continues to languish and yet the u.s. economy has shown resiliency but it is not immune from fiscal shock and that's something i clearly continue to monitor. >> all right, joe, thank you very much for coming on the practical. have we have good news for the in you year. thank you very much. >> you as well. thank you. >> joe davis, chief economist at ativan guard group >> susie: still ahead, the top tech trends for 2013, or how your cell phone will become an even bigger part of your life in the new year. >> susie: a lot of mixed messages for investors today. joining us now to sort through it all, ann miletti, senior portfolio manager at wells fargo advantage funds. >> so, anne, what do you think you heard, the economist talking about a mild recession. are we in for a correction in the stock market if that happens? >> i think right now the market is trying to predict how long this uncertainty is going to last. so right now, you know, because the market is a measuring tool, it's measuring how long the uncertainty with the fiscal cliff will last. if it's short and we get a re
. >> there are lots and lots of brands. this is just one brand. these are manufactured in japan? >> these are manufactured all over the world. they have two factories in georgia and then factories all around the world. >> what are the differences between these different kind of toilets? >> we have the 1.28, which is what all the manufacturers are doing now to conserve water. this is a siphon flush with a larger water surface area, much more conventional american type of toilet. it has been used around the world for many years as a water- conserving light of flushing. it has a small water surface area and is a wash down type of toilet. some americans are not happy that they might have to clean the sides of the ball more. then, we have the high end totally automated toilet as you were already noticing. when you walk up to it, it will sense that you are there and it will open up. it has another green feature, which washes you. it saves you on toilet paper. a roll of toilet paper can take as much as 28 gallons to be manufactured, so if you conserve on toilet paper by using water to
told me about her brother being ill. he at one point went from hong kong to japan to recuperate. he was the one that wanted to be an artist and wanted to paint. i thought about that because it must have been hard growing up in hong kong to be far away from everything and have a dream and get sick at this point. i thought u is there a story here? that's the way it begins for writers. people think things jump out and we have it in our head. it's the opposite we have nothing in our head. we turn on the machine and praying for something to come. with women of the silk i researched for 6 amongs and read and read and read. in one book i found 2 lines about the woman silk workers and knew immediately that's hai wanted to write about. it came to me like a dream that every writer prays for that you just knew you wanted to write about this. with the second book it was difficult i sat down and didn't know what i was going to write for about 6 months. which was fearful for me because of the fact i knew i didn't have the second book. steven's story, i asked myself questions. a lot of writers do
in thailand or dolphins in japan. and you can't do everything. so in thinking what do i really want to do? >> reporter: to answer that question, you could say eva longoria looked in the mirror. >> i knew i wanted it to be with women and in the latina community. >> reporter: known for playing the vixen on "desperate housewives" longoria had humble beginnings born to mexican-american parents. >> i wasn't the first to go to college. >> it wasn't a walk in the park. you had to work. >> i was flipping burgers, i was an assistant to a dentist, worked in a car shop, i was definitely a work study. >> reporter: 17% of latinas drop out of high school. fewer than half of adult latinas hold college degrees. so in 2010 she started a foundation focusing on helping latinas get a college education. >> i just have to smooz with them. >> reporter: on the day we meet up with her at this high school in los angeles, she's the keynote speaker at a graduation for parents. >> everyone here is taking a stand for their child. >> reporter: her foundation is helping to fund piqe. >> it's a program parents can take i
in 2012. japan nikkei up .07. china, shanghai index finned up -- let's take a look at markets yesterday. they closed slightly down. what they are watching today is what they have been watching for awhile now. and very closely yesterday that is the fiscal cliff talks to see if any progress can be made on capitol hill. >>> romantics at odds with cal trans. why those locks of love are scheduled to come down. >>> mom started crying. dad started crying. we're all hugging. it was great. >>> >> and a baby who just couldn't wait any longer. the roadside delivery some paramedics are being applauded for this morning. >>> you can wake up with ktvu every morning. >> get the morning top stories sent to your cell phone every weekday morning at 6:00 a.m.. you can get the wake up call by texting wakeup to 70123. >>> depending on your point of view it's a symbol of every lasting love or vandalism. about 25 couples have hung padlocks on the main street bridge. it started with a couple celebrating their 30th anniversary in august. they got the idea at a similar landmark locked up by lovers around the worl
overseas at japan, last trading day of the year, shares closing, get this, at the highest level since last year's tsunami for the year gaining 23%, the biggest percentage rise since 2005. ending on a nice positive note over there. david: wish it was good here. congressional leaders meeting with the president, what's hanging on the edge of the cliff is higher taxes on dividends. coming up, the chairman and ceo of southern company owning a bunch of power companies in the south tells us why the tax hike would be a huge blow to his industry, a blow everybody will feel as usual. it's passed on to you, the consumer. >> financials a big winner up this year we have an analyst who expects the gravy train to roll on next year. find out the banks he likes for 2013. david: a lot to cover, but first, what drove the markets with the data download. ending the week down more than 1.5%. lack of progress, of course, in the miscall cliff negotiations, and all ten s&p sectors in the negative tear -- territory the second week in a row. oil slipped into the red today, but finished the holiday shortened weekend
, also the 2009 world series mvp. before he came to the u.s. he was already the biggest star on japan's biggest team. >>> behold the most annoying words of 2012. classic time honored whatever, third year at the top, annoying pick, those on the list are like, you know, and just sayin'. >> like. >> like you know just sayin' whatever. >> my nieces i stop them and say no. >> what if they say like? >> absolutely. it is forbidden in the house unless you use it properly. >> can i just point out hideki matsui when i spent time in japan he was much more popular than ichiro even though ichiro was a greater baseball player. ichiro was reviewed as remote and distance. hideki was the guy next door you could have a beer with. >> i remember when he came to the u.s. maybe this is a sign i'm getting older, 2003 doesn't seem like that long ago. >> he's retiring? really, didn't he just get here? >> were you collecting baseball cards? >> no i was not. >> are you sure? >> all right. >> when alina started i was aware god zillizilla was being n out. >>> a high level meeting to find a fiscal cliff deal. our
, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. it's a car like no other... from a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> have you ever been to hobby lobby? if you're in the market for fake flowers or beads or yarn, you may find yourself in a hobby lobby. now, me, i'm not so good at the crafting. this is my handwriting. i can barely use a pen, much less actually fold anything or use scissors. you don't want me around scissors. but many americans do know their way around a hot glue gun, as evidenced by the existence of 525 of these hobby lobby stores spread all across the country. the hobby lobby chain was founded by a guy named david green. he's still the ceo and worth $4.5 billion, which is a lot. according to the store's statement of purpose, however, mr. green's main goal in founding his crafting empire was to sell scrapbooks or construction paper or even to make billions of dollars. it was to honor the lord and operate the company in a manner consistent with biblical principle
or dolphins in japan. you can't do everything. so i'm thinking what do i really want to do. where can i create the most impact? >> reporter: to answer that question you could say eva longoria looked in the mirror. known for playing the vixen on "desperate housewives", longoria had humble beginnings. the youngest of four daughters born in texas to mexican-american parents. . . >> i wasn't the first to go to college. it was expected. >> when you went to college, it wasn't a walk in the park. you had to work. >> i was flipping burgers, i was an assistant to a dentist, i worked in a car shop changing oil. i was definitely a work study. >> 17% of latinas drop out of high school. so in 2010 the actress started a foundation focusing on helping latinas get a college education. >> so i just have to smooz with them. >> reporter: on the day we meet up with her at this high school in los angeles, she's the keynote speaker at a graduation for parents. >> everyone here has taken a stand for their child. >> reporter: their program is called piqe. >> parents can take the course in order to help them navigate
the biggest star on japan's biggest team when he left tokyo. >>> this is a blast from baseball's past, but doesn't have any place in today's pc society? more on the baseball logo causing controversy this morning. >>> plus, parents and young orphans caught in the middle of an international dispute between the u.s. and russia the new development overnight on adoptions is just ahead. a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet the five-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max says ha. c-max says wheeee. which is what you get, don't you see? cause c-max has lots more horsepower than prius v, a hybrid that c-max also bests in mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. >>> good news, ali veshi is in. >> never good news when i spend too much time on tv. it means a financial calamity is coming. that's not why i'm here today. a high-level meeting at the white house. we are talking to debbie stabenow and olympia snowe. and ken rogoff, one of the world's foremost experts on financial crises. >>> a crime reverberated across this country. a
, getting some data out of japan overnight and some data out of europe. currently red arrows across the board, in london, paris, and frankfort. our road map begins at the white house. congressional leaders set to meet with the president, 3:00 p.m. this afternoon. senator reid has already said hopes of a deal are fading quickly. just two trading days left until the cliff. and it's not just the fiscal cliff. wind farms and dairy are set to get hit. >> the ports of the east coast and gulf coast are bracing for a potential strike. the potential for this, midnight sunday with a shutdown threatening to threaten 20% of the cargo traffic. >> and instagram feeling the sting of the flap around privacy with users, fleeing the site. how will this impact facebook? >> as we mentioned, dennis berman, "wall street journal" market place editor is joining us here on set once again for the next hour. good to have you back, dennis. lots to talk about between the cliff and other news. >> three days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, congressional leaders will meet with the president this aftern
in thailand or dolphins in japan and you can't do everything. and so in thinking what do i really want to do, where can i create the most impact? >> reporter: to answer that question, you could say eva longoria looked in the mirror. >> i always knew i wanted to be with women and within the latino community. >> reporter: best known for playing the vixen on "desperate housewives." >> how are you? >> the best you ever had. >> reporter: -- longoria had humble beginnings. the youngest of four daughters in texas to mexican-american parents. >> i wasn't the first to go to college. it was expected. >> reporter: let's be honest, you went to college, it wasn't a walk in the park. you had to work. >> i was flipping burgers. i was an assistant to a dentist. i worked in a car shop changing oil. i was an aerobics instructor. i was a work-study. >> reporter: 17% of latinas drop out of high school. fewer than half of adult latinas hold college degrees. in 2010, the actress started a foundation, focusing on helping latinas get a college education. >> i just have to schmooze with them. >> reporter: on the day
degrees. we have had the craziest weather, rain in japan, hot and humid in singapore and snow at the great while. korea though, very nice. i better get going. thanks for tuning into whitehouse.gov. i'm signing off from alaska. let's go. >> the trip director on that one kenny thompson, he needed us to get on the plane. the plane was ready to leave and he was like i need one more tae, i need one more tae, we can do it on the plane. it was not quite enough. and with that tragedy had like two opened up to questions if anyone has any. i think you are all supposed to use this microphone so i will get that one. >> the did i understand that you said that once you films for the day, you could not add it? you had to use everything. >> no, no i can't decide if i want to keep something for the archives are not. every time the camera went on and off again all that has to go to the presidential library for the archives. anything that was released with go through a normal process like in a still photograph to the press shop in the white house white house and in the release but we are talking about hardsh
a mentor with sort of a confucian touch because he had a japanese heritage and i had an interest in japan and he had a way of imparting judgments and wisdom which were in the eastern method, very subtle. he was not always that way, but he could be, and he was with me. i learned from him how this chamber works, how to get things done. i watched the way he did them. not with a heavy fist or sharp words, but with thoughtfulness, hard work, a commanding presence, that voice, that voice. and genuine relationships, including across the aisle. he believed in action, he believed in getting things done through hard work an through determination. and he had very much of an agenda. dan, of course, was one of our nation's ultimate war heroes, not only because of his service and sacrifice but also somebody who stood up for his country even when his country did not immediately stand up for him. dan's courage and iron will were evident as he fought on the battlefield taking bullet after bullet, yet continuing to get back up. a tough soldier. and he fought for the people of hawaii, every single day that
art works of 18 -- 19th century japan. the first piece -- this is very much a comic piece, and i do hope that you had type to look at the text of the program. i apologize for the formatting however my talents do not lay in the area of design. what i had hoped to do so you have line by line happening and the english equivalent and those of you that have not had a chance to look at the text very briefly this is a parody of buddhist ritual. a priest decides he is going to show the powers of mystic buddhism and he appears and on the alter with different sorts ofornmen of owns and then progresses through profound things and all of these are tongue twisters but it's the first round of tongue twisters nothing happens and the priest is very upset and blushes extraordinary red and he tries again. the second time the chants are much shorter and he begins to lose his patience and again nothing happens. third time nothing happens and he basically says how much time to turn to the wonderrous powers of the lotus set raand he does chanting and the parody is something like if anyone is old
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